Tamanu Oil | Plus Rosehip and Baobab | Fades stretch mark and Restores skin cells

Products containing Tamanu , Rosehip and Baobab Oil:

Tamanu oil has been used for thousands of years in the polynesian, african and asian cultures. It has excellent antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, antiviral , anti-fungicide, and anti-septic properties [1,3]. As a result of its unique multi-functional , medicinal and non-medicinal properties, it works excellent in scar reduction, acne, psoriasis, dry skin, eczema, wound, blisters, rashes,stretch marks, skin odor, and many other skin inflammation related issues[1].

Tamanu Oil is also known as "Calophyllum inophyllum". It takes about 200lbs of tamanu fruit to make about 10 lbs of tamanu oil and is a very labor intensive process for a small amount of oil.(4)

Tamanu Stretch mark oil

 

Stretch mark oil containing a blend of organic tamanu oil, rose-hip and baobab is a very effective mixture that helps fade the appearance of stretch mark. Why is this so? Tamanu oil applied to blisters is stated to promote the regeneration of new tissue and accelerate the formation of healthy skin. The general composition of Tamanu oil consists of over 90% neutral lipid, >6 % of triacylglycerol and > 1% of phospholipids. This makes it an oil very rich in fatty acid [1, 2].

                                               

                                                        TAMANU                                                 

Rosehip oil is also another oil which is rich in essential fatty acid particularly linoleic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3). It is extracted from the seed of rose bush. Rose hip has a rich abundance of vitamin C, carotenoids, polyphenol and various flavonoid. In fact, studies show that the natural vitamin A & vitamin E helps support & maintain skin cells, protect the skin from DNA damage and burns while serving as an anti-aging ingredient. Rosehip has strong anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. [5]

                                                                                                   

                                      ROSEHIP               

Furthermore, Baobab oil is another excellent oil rich in anti-oxidant. It is said that the baobab fruit contains 7-10 times more vitamin C content than oranges. It is called the super-fruit because it is packed with natural vitamins, fatty acid, amino acid, and minerals. It also has anti-microbial, anti-viral, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. [6]. Research shows that the combination of natural vitamin C and E is far superior than alone. [5]

 

                                    

                               BAOBAB 

The combination of these oils makes them a force to be reckoned with, ensuring a very effective chemical free alternative which supports a blemish-free and firmer skin .This promotes natural skin regeneration, elasticity and resiliency. Thereby, making it suitable for daily use and general skin maintenance.

 References

1. Kilham C. "Tamanu Oil: A tropical topical remedy", pg 26-31. Herbalgram 2004.

2. Dweck A.C & Meadows T 2002. Tamanu (Calophyllum inophyllum)- The African, Asian, Polynesian and pacific Pancea. International journal of cosmetic science, 24(6),341-348

3. Li Yz, Li Zi,Hua Hm, LI Zg,Liu Ms. Studies on flavonoids from stems and leaves of Calophyllum inophyllum. School of traditional chinese Materia Medica, Shenyang pharmaceutical university, Shenyang 110016, China. Citation 16, Reference 12,10, [8,13]

4. Friday,J.B.,& Okano,D. (2006).Callophyllum inophyllum (Kamani) species profiles for pacific island Agroforestry, 2(1),1-17.

5. Phetcharat L, Wongsuphasawat K, Winther K. " The effectiveness of a standardized rosehip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity,skin wrinkles, moistures and elasticity. 19 Nov 2015. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655903/pdf/cia-10-1849.pdf

6. Kamatou G.P.P, Vermaak I, Viljoen A.M, "An updated review pf adasonia digitata: A commercially important African tree". South African Journal of Botany 77 (2011) pg 908-919.

 

 

 

 


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